Ronald Fowlkes of Firstspear: From Customer to Co-Owner

Ronnie Fowlkes is a proud veteran of the United States Marine Corps (USMC) with more than 20 years of experience delivering top rate gear, whose design and development he is also experienced in, for all of those enlisted in armed services.

 

He came across the FirstSpear brand while is service, and was pleased by the quality of its products. Upon discovering they were built in his hometown, he inquired and ended, not only working for them, but became co-owner as well. Such a move, as far as business goes, was a wise one for Ronald because of the stability of the company. It makes money through regular means, such as attending trade show and carrying out routine marketing initiatives, but they also have contacts within the government, as well as direct recommendations from the users themselves. The quality and consistency of FirstSpear’s work ensures repeat business.

 

Fowlkes found himself in the unique position of being a user of the products he eventually became the maker of. This assured him that the products worked and that they were of the best quality. Because of this, selling what he made became no hard task. Assisting trade shows allows the company to demonstrate its goods, and through this, business finds them instead of them having to seek it out.

 

For Ronnie Fowlkes, having been a leader from very early on has taught and allowed him to lead by example. He focuses on making sure tasks get accomplished and has his eyes on the continued development of bigger and better products for their customers.

 

He coaches a youth hockey league and has a love for the game, which he dedicates good time to. He recently authored an article in his personal blog in which he expressed that fighting in the National Hockey League is disappearing. He pointed to statistical evidence which show that in the last ten years, the frequency of fight breakouts has diminished to less than 20 percent. Such has been the case during the 2017 – 2018 season, while during 2008 – 2009, there was an altercation in almost half of the games.

 

He establishes that fighting was regulated into the National Hockey League almost a century ago, in 1922, and it was used as a strategy to energize the players and interrupt the momentum of the game. Since then, however, the players have become better skilled, the game has become faster and there are ever stricter rules. This has all led to more scores and meaningful wins, which, along with parity among players, has taken importance away from physical altercations. Teams are clear that in these times the best way to change the momentum of a game is by scoring more points, not throwing more punches.

 

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